STUD Australia Pride Gay Harness

Updated: Mar 3

Gay Pride, also called LGBT Pride or LGBTQ Pride, byname Pride, annual celebration, usually in June in the United States and sometimes at other times in other countries, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identity. Gay Pride commemorates the Stonewall riots, which began in the early hours of June 28, 1969, after police raided the Stonewall Inn bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village neighborhood. Gay Pride typically involves a series of events and is often capped by a parade involving marchers and colourful floats from the LGBTQ community and its supporters.




Gay Pride Chest Harness

life is about colours and being free to fearlessly love whoever you want without any discrimination. TRADE harness has super soft and stretchable elastics in a rainbow striped pattern with a flattering lattice design

STUD LIFE DAYTONA HARNESS

DAYTONA harness has super soft and stretchable rainbow coloured elastics in a complex lattice design that flatters and shows off your chest. A quality signature metal ring completes this must have harness! Definitely a centre stage design at the coming Pride march


Each year, thousands of people, go to the gay parade to support the cause. Many countries gathered more than 500,000 attendees last year, and the number of people increases in each new edition.


Cities around the world will celebrate with music, poetry, theater, parties, discuss issues, sports and social events, exhibits and live entertainment the LGTB Pride.

Gay Pride, also called LGBT Pride or LGBTQ Pride, byname Pride, annual celebration, usually in June in the United States and sometimes at other times in other countries, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identity. Gay Pride commemorates the Stonewall riots, which began in the early hours of June 28, 1969, after police raided the Stonewall Inn bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village neighbourhood. Gay Pride typically involves a series of events and is often capped by a parade involving marchers and colourful floats from the LGBTQ community and its supporters


Here some of the countries around the world:


Hong Kong Pride - The first pride parade in Hong Kong was held on May 16, 2005, under the theme "Turn Fear into Love", calling for acceptance and care among gender and sexual minorities in a diverse and friendly society.

The Hong Kong Pride Parade 2008 boosted the rally count above 1,000 in the second largest Pride after Taipei’s. By now a firmly annual event, Pride 2013 saw more than 5,200 participants. The city continues to hold the event every year, except in 2010 when it was not held due to a budget shortfall. In the Hong Kong Pride Parade 2018, the event breaks the record with 12000 participants and the police arrested a participant who violated the law of outraging public decency.


Taiwan Pride - On November 1, 2003 the first Taiwan Pride was held in Taipei with over 1,000 people attending. The parade held in September 2008 attracted around 18,000 participants, making it one of the largest gay pride events in Asia,

After 2008, the numbers grew rapidly. In 2009 around five thousand people participated in the gay parade under the slogan "Love out loud". In 2010, despite bad weather conditions the Taiwan gay parade "Out and Vote" attracted more than 30,000 people, making it the largest such event in Asia. In 2017, around 123,000 people participated in the gay parade.


Israel Pride - Tel Aviv hosts an annual pride parade, attracting more than 260,000 people, making it the largest LGBT pride event in Asia. Three Pride parades took place in Tel Aviv on the week of June 11, 2010. The main parade, which is also partly funded by the city's municipality, was one of the largest ever to take place in Israel, with approximately 200,000 participants. The first Pride parade in Tel Aviv took place in 1993.


Europe - The very first South-Eastern European Pride, called The Internationale Pride, was assumed to be a promotion of the human right to freedom of assembly in Croatia and some Eastern European states, where such rights of the LGBT population are not respected, and a support for organising the very first Prides in that communities. Out of all ex-Yugoslav states, at that time only Slovenia and Croatia had a tradition of organising Pride events, whereas the attempt to organize such an event in Belgrade, Serbia in 2001, ended in a bloody showdown between the police and the counter-protesters, with the participants heavily beaten up. This manifestation was held in Zagreb, Croatia from June 22–25, 2006 and brought together representatives of those Eastern European and South-eastern European countries where the sociopolitical climate is not ripe for the organization of Prides, or where such a manifestation is expressly forbidden by the authorities. From 13 countries that participated, only Poland, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania and Latvia have been organizing Prides.


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